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Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Centers which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
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Fires in Alaska
 
US Forest Service Fire Fighter
USFS

Managing Fires in Alaska

AICC Current Fires Map of Alaska 

  • At certain periods during a fire season, wildfires can be so widespread, numerous, or burning so hot that they cannot be put out easily.
  • Fire is a natural part of Alaska’s ecosystem. Many positive benefits of fire have been recognized.
  • Fire-suppression efforts sometimes are more damaging than the wildfire.

Fire is a part of the natural environmental cycle as well as a potential destroyer of life, property, and resources. 

In remote and unsettled areas, fires are monitored to assure they do not burn unchecked toward areas where human life or development could be threatened. This cooperative AICC plan is working well and has saved millions of local, state, and federal tax dollars.



Shipwreck Cove Fire 2013. Photo by AlaskaNPS. Fire facts Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Fire and Rescue practice in Kodiak. Smokey Bear


 
Arial view of a wildfire near the Anaktuvuk River Fire in 2007. Smoke billows from a vast, flat landscape. Did You Know?
Until the summer of 2007, the Inupiat Eskimo elders of Barrow had never heard thunder or seen lightning. The same thunderstorm they witnessed ignited the Anaktuvuk River fire, which burned 400 sq mi of tundra on the North Slope, the largest wildfire ever recorded on the Earth’s tundra.