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Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Center which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
Image shows the trip planning area at the Alaska Public Lands Information Center in Fairbanks. Racks of brochures and two computer terminals are set up next to a customer service window. Two map tables with several chairs sit in the middle of a brightly lit space to the right.
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Directions to the Tok Alaska Center
 
Tok is located Milepost 1314 Alaska Highway, at the junction with the Tok Cutoff (Glenn Highway)
 It is located approximately 328 miles away from Anchorage, 206 miles from Fairbanks, 254 miles from Valdez, and 93 miles from the Canadian border.
NPS

Visitor Information Center

1314 Alaska Hwy

Tok, AK 99780

 

Tok lies at the junction of the Alaskan Highway and the Glenn Highway on Milepost 1314. It is located approximately 328 miles away from Anchorage, 206 miles from Fairbanks, 254 miles from Valdez, and 93 miles from the Canadian border. With highways leading to Tok from every direction, this community receives a number of travelers yearly of all backgrounds. If you are headed South, you can reach Prince William Sound. If you are headed North, the Taylor Highway will bring you to the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve.




With highways leading to Tok from every direction, this community receives a number of travelers yearly of all backgrounds.
NPS

Directions from Anchorage to the Tok Visitor Information Center

Take AK-1 N/ Glenn Highway

Exit on Alaska 1 E toward Palmer/Glennallen

Merge onto AK - 1 N

Turn left onto AK - 1 N/ AK - 4 N/ State Highway 1 toward Fairbanks/Canada

Turn right onto AK - 1 N

Turn right onto AK - 2 E

( Destination will be on the left )

 





 
A distant profile shot of a cow moose and calf standing in knee high, dry grasses. A small copse of spruce trees are in the distance and low, dark mountains are on the horizon. Did You Know?
The abundance of wildlife has made the Yukon Delta the heart of the Yup'iq Eskimo culture in Alaska. Forty-two Native villages are located within the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge boundary. Residents depend upon the fish, wildlife, and other resources to continue a subsistence lifestyle.