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Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Center which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
The gentle cascades of the Fire Cove Waterfall are surrounded by lush foliage and fallen trees covered in thick moss.
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U.S. Forest Service
 
US Forest Service logo. Gold lettering on green shield with a gold border. At the center, a pine tree stands between the letters U and S. Forest service is written at the top and the words Department of Agriculture are on the bottom.
USFS
The U.S. Forest Service Logo

U.S. Forest Service, Alaska Region
The mission of the Alaska Region of the Forest Service is to manage the Chugach and Tongass National Forests to meet society’s needs for a variety of goods, services, and amenities while enhancing the Forests’ health and productivity, and to foster similar outcomes for State and private forestland across Alaska.

The U.S. Forest Service is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture, and can be reached at http://www.fs.fed.us/r10



Distant view of a hiker wearing a fleece coat, ball cap and a backpack. The man stands on a small rise looking out over a lush and expansive mountain valley. The sky is cloudy.
USFS
There is endless backcountry hiking in Tongass National Forest.

The Tongass National Forest is roughly 17 million acres, the largest national forest. To learn more about what the Tongass National Forest has to offer visit
http://www.fs.fed.us/r10/tongass/forest_facts/forest_facts.shtml

To learn about more things to do in the Chugach National Forest go to
http://www.fs.fed.us/r10/chugach

Interested in Maps of the National Forests in Alaska?
Visit http://www.fs.fed.us/r10/ro/maps-brochures





 
A map shows the migration route of humans traveling from Asia to the Americas by way of the Bering land bridge. The two continents were once connected and are referred to by historians as Beringia. Did You Know?
During the late Wisconsinan glaciation, so much of Earth's water was locked up in huge ice masses that the sea level fell 280 to 350 feet below today's level. This exposed an area up to 1,000 miles wide that stretched between Siberia and Alaska, called Beringia, allowing humans to cross from Asia.